Category Archives: Pacific Intercultural Exchange

2006 Feb 22: Student Exchange Programs an Unregulated Industry

©Gloucester County Times | By REESA MARCHETTI Staff Writer

Guzel of Sterlitamak, Russia, 15 years old, plays basketball and enjoys running. She likes music, literature and dancing and is in the choir. She has two younger brothers. Her teacher says, “She is rather modest, kind, polite and ready to help others.”

As described in a foreign exchange student agency brochure, inviting a youngster like Guzel to stay in your home may sound like a wonderful way to promote international goodwill and expand your cultural awareness.

But recent problems encountered by a host family in Pittsgrove Township have led many people to wonder who regulates the agencies that bring in these students — and what is the cost, to the families, the students and the school districts.

Gitte Hommelgaard, 18, of Denmark has become the object of controversy since she arrived in Pittsgrove last month to stay with the Pokrovsky family and attend Arthur P. Shalick High School there.

Because the school had recently changed its exchange student policy to require 90 days notice to register a foreign student, Hommelgaard was denied admission. Her host mother, Sandy Pokrovsky, appealed the school board’s decision to the state department of education and won emergency relief to enroll the Danish teen at Schalick.

According to the Council on Standards for International Educational Travel (CSIET), the agency that placed the Danish student should have secured written acceptance from a school official before sending her to the Pokrovsky’s home.

The CSIET, however, is a strictly voluntary system of self-monitoring to which exchange agencies may apply. Adhering to such standards is not legally required in order for an organization to place students from other countries in U.S. schools — and homes.

There are no regulations that control how or when foreign exchange students attend New Jersey’s public schools.

Rich Vespucci, a spokesman at the N.J. Department of Education, said those issues are handled by local boards of education.

“It is a local decision,” Vespucci said. “There aren’t any state regulations that apply to it.”

Nationally, exchange agencies are self-regulated via several voluntary programs. The United States Information Agency (USIA) designates non-profit organizations that meet their requirements, and authorizes them to issue applications for one-year student visas.

The national Association of Secondary School Principals’ CSIET sanctions both non-profit and private agencies who voluntarily submit to their guidelines. Many agencies, such as the Cultural Academic Student Exchange (CASE), which placed Hommelgaard in Pittsgrove, are designated by both the USIA and the CSIET.

Legally, agencies do not have to register with either one in order to arrange student exchanges. Students do not need an agency to get visa applications — they may obtain the visas for themselves, or school principals here or abroad may arrange for the student to get them.

The USIA has a booklet with more than 40 pages of regulations, and operating and financial criteria, that organizations must meet in order to become USIA-designated.

So how does this federal agency monitor its 1,100 exchange programs, of which approximately 70 deal exclusively with high school students? USIA public liaison Bill Reinckens said the only way his office can regulate them is when a complaint is received.

“It is handled on a case by case basis until the situation is resolved,” he said. “We don’t have the staff and resources to be pro-active in our monitoring.

“However, we do a lot more than respond to complaints. We handle the general administration and procedures involved in conducting these exchange programs. As part of this effort, there is constant dialogue and a regular relationship between the USIA and the program organizations we designate.”

Reinckens stressed that contrary to what many of the agencies imply in their advertising, they cannot issue student visas. They are only allowed to supply the application forms.

“The USIA issues application forms that the organizations complete for the participants,” he said. “Then the participants take them to the U.S. consulate in their home country. The students pursue the visas in their country.”

Reinckens suggests that people thinking of hosting an exchange student check with their local better business bureau or department of education. Unlike New Jersey, he said that some states have adopted laws governing exchange agencies.

Various states, among them Washington, Minnesota and California,” he said, “have passed laws and regulations regarding these kinds of organizations.”

According to Reinckens, 23,000 to 25,000 foreign students attend public school in the U.S. annually on J-1 visas, assisted by USIA-designated agencies. One of the provisions of J-1 is that there are no repeat visits allowed.

“Students on a J-1 can be here for a minimum of one semester to a maximum one-year stay,” he said. “There’s another kind called an F student visa, where a student can stay as long as a high school issues an I-20 form. The high school is responsible for issuing that form.

“Another kind of visa is a B-visa, which is a visitors visa for short-term visits. For example, a student may enter the U.S. on a B-visa if they are just going to attend a class for a few weeks.”

* * *

Some of the methods used by exchange agencies to locate and screen host families for foreign students can cause problems for all parties involved.

Robert Bender, the superintendent of the Carneys Point-Penns Grove district said he has been troubled to see ads for host families on telephone poles just prior to the start of the school year.

“That caused part of the problem,” he said. “They didn’t find families until late in the summer. I think it’s a worthwhile program, but they need to find host families first before bringing the students over.

“Once they do that, it will eliminate a lot of concerns the schools have.”

Bender said that although having a foreign student can be a benefit for the school, it is difficult for administrators to prepare for the student’s needs on short notice.

“A foreign student is a living social studies lesson right in the classroom — there’s so much to be gained by our own students,” he said. “But at the end of summer where you have transfer students coming at the last minute, exchange students make it a little more difficult. We need to review their transcripts and find out where they should be placed.

“You want them to be successful when they’re here. If you only have a day or two, that’s not the way we like it to be. It’s better to do this in time to properly place them.”

Danish student Hommelgaard recently got a lesson in the problems school officials have to deal with when placing a student from another country. Although she is 18 and is taking mostly Grade 12 courses, she had to be placed in junior level history when she started classes at Schalick on Wednesday.

“It’s a bit difficult when you don’t know it,” she said. “I know more Danish history than American history.”

According to Bender, a girl from Russia who attended Penns Grove High School last year didn’t work out and ended up going back home.

Penny Tarplin, the Pittsburgh area CASE director, said that it is not unusual to have to place a child as late as August.

“Sometimes a placement falls through,” she said. “In May, the father of a family here had a heart attack and died.

“Or sometimes a student cancels. I’ve been doing this for 24 years and we learn everything the hard way.”

Ads seeking host families by the Pittsburgh CASE organization can be found in locations as diverse as local newspapers to a page on the Internet.

Tarplin said that except in the few states that require police background checks for host families, her organization is not allowed to request them. Instead, she said she relies on her instincts at an in-home interview with all family members, and three letters of recommendation obtained by the host parents.

“A police check has not been necessary so far,” she said.   “We expect the references to take care of that —  someone will spill the beans if there are problems.

“I went to visit a potential family once, and all over their wall, they had guns. Needless to say, we did not place a student with them.”

Ellen Battaglia, who is the president of the national CASE organization based in Middletown, agreed that CASE representatives have to use their “professional experience” to find a safe, compatible match between a student and a host family.

“If a student calls and has the slightest qualms about a family, we take the student out,” she said. “We’ve never had any sexual or physical abuse from the host family.”

John Doty is a member of CSIET’s board of directors, as well as the director of Pacific Intercultural Exchange, a West Coast-based student exchange organization. He agreed that being able to do police checks on potential families would be ideal, but not possible in most cases.

“I would feel more comfortable if we had access to criminal background checks,” he said. “We would love nothing more than to tap into a database to find this out.”

According to Doty, even in areas where host families are required by law to agree to a background check, the cost and length of time it would take — up to six months — can be prohibitive.

“Our program’s application form asks if anyone in the family has ever committed a felony,” he said, “but if you ask and the answer comes back no, what good is it? We have to assume that it’s answered correctly.”

Doty said his agency checks with the schools, as well as asking potential host families for personal references.

“If the school says, I wouldn’t place a student with that family, we listen,” he said. “Our program brought in 20,000 students in the past 20 years and never had any reported abuse.”

Tarpin said that to facilitate the student and family getting along, she holds an orientation meeting within 10 days of the student’s arrival in the United States.

“There usually are little things that are cultural that they have to get used to,” she said.

As a local representative, she is expected to stay in close contact with the student and the family, by phone and in person, to help them through any problems during the student’s stay.

Battaglia said that CASE workers are independent contractors who receive $20 a month for each student they supervise.

* * *

The CASE organization is currently under scrutiny by the USIA and the CSIET for its actions in placing the Danish student with the Pokrovsky family.

“We look for patterns of concern,” said Anne Shattuck, CSIET director of operations. “Is this an isolated incident or is this a pattern? Our standards require written acceptance from the school prior to assigning a student to a family, but there may be extenuating circumstances where a phone call worked.”

Because each organization must reapply annually to be CSIET-designated, the incident will not be considered until the CSIET board’s regular meeting in January, Shattuck said.

Doty said that the majority of companies placing foreign students are not regulated at all.

“The USIA has stringent rules, but for-profit agencies are not regulated,” he said. “There are problems of screening issues because programs don’t have to comply with any standards.”

Doty said that when he helped push for legislation in his home state of California, one of the biggest problems faced was identifying organizations that are not designated by the USIA or CSIET.

“It’s impossible to know how many programs are out there,” he said. “Some are here today and gone tomorrow.

“Part of the problem comes from schools being unaware of the nature of this business. If the schools were more selective and knew what to look for in an exchange program, I think they would be diminishing their potential for problems.”

Doty said that non-designated, for-profit agencies are not necessarily bad.

“Some are excellent and have wonderful reputations,” he said.

Woodstown High School Principal Steve Merckel said being a non-profit agency doesn’t exclude everyone involved in it from making money.

“Non-profit doesn’t mean that the people who head them up don’t get big salaries,” he said.

To some school administrators, the addition of a foreign exchange student to the class rolls can be a culturally enriching experience for the entire student body, but others don’t accept them.

Kathleen Carfagno, administrative assistant to the Gloucester County Superintendent of Schools, said districts differ in their views on exchange students.

“We’ve talked about it with the local principals group. There are some schools, by policy, who say that we are not going to accept them,” she said. “Others say it’s a good opportunity to learn from someone from a foreign country.”

Merckel cited good experiences with students placed by both the 4-H and the Youth for Understanding organizations in the school district.

“They do an excellent job of monitoring students and working with families,” he said. “They usually take families known within the organization. I’ve worked with agencies before that don’t screen the kids or families well, and don’t give support when you have problems.”

Merkel said the school’s foreign exchange student policy, which was revised to limit exchange students to four per year, has helped the district avoid problems.

“Limiting the number you have in one year,” he said, “allows you to better give assistance to the students.”

* * *

The expense to the school district for enrolling a foreign student for a year is difficult to determine, but appears to be minimal. Henry Bermann, the board secretary and business administrator for the Pittsgrove district, said that the cost per student to attend Schalick is budgeted at $6,500.

“But we won’t know the actual audited cost until the following year,” he said.

One of the reasons the cost can’t be determined immediately is that state aid, which is granted per student enrolled, is often based on enrollment figures for the previous year. So in many cases, having an exchange student could result in increased state funding to a district.

An average of four or five exchange students a year may attend Kingsway Regional High School in Woolwich Township, according to Superintendent Terence Crowley.

“The biggest thing in my opinion,” he said, “is that it allows our kids to meet with other students from other countries.”

Crowley said there is another benefit to the exchange programs — Kingsway students have had the opportunity to study in other countries including Japan, Brazil and Ecuador.

Staff writer Cynthia Collier contributed to this  report

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Color added by editor | Aside from USIA being replaced by Department of State, the same issues raised in this article keep on occuring today. John Doty’s Pacific International was taken off CSIET’s approved list as late as 2012 due to severe breaches. This is not by any means a naive or innocent industry.

2010 Sep 09: Foreign exchange student goes home to Kazakhstan (PIE)

Maryland Community Newspapers Online

Thursday, Sept. 9, 2010

Mix-up prevented her from being enrolled in Frederick High School
by Katherine Heerbrandt | Staff Writer

A foreign exchange student who was denied entrance into Frederick County Public Schools this semester returned to her home country of Kazakhstan last week.

Taissiya Kryazhova had hoped to be a student at Frederick High School, but a mix-up with her entrance paperwork and other complications prevented her enrollment.

She was a scholarship student in the Future Leaders Exchange Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and administered by Pacific Intercultural Exchange, based in California.

Her host family, Gerry and Peg Marose of Frederick, tried to enroll her in Frederick Christian Academy, but she was sent to a host family in Massachusetts instead.

According to John M. Doty, president of the Pacific Intercultural Exchange, Kryazhova asked to return to her home country while in Massachusetts. Kryazhova had expressed her unhappiness with the situation in several e-mails to the Maroses.

In an e-mail to the Maroses, Doty called the situation “one misunderstanding after another,” and thanked them for the advocacy and care they provided Kryazhova during her brief stay in Frederick.

The Committee for the Safety of Foreign Exchange Students, a nonprofit also based in California, reported the Pacific Intercultural Exchange organization to the U.S. Department of State, saying the organization violated regulations by not having Kryazhova enrolled in school before she came to the U.S.

Doty countered in an e-mail that he had addressed the allegations with the Department of State, and that interpretations of his organization’s role in the fiasco are “inaccurate.”

The Maroses said in an e-mail they were “extremely saddened” that Taya was sent to Massachusetts.

“This has been an experience that none of us will forget,” the Maroses said in the e-mail. “We are grateful for the community response to the needs of the wonderful student and especially to those in the media that have championed on Taya’s behalf.”

The Maroses said they have been in touch with Yerlan Kubashev, counsel of the Republic of Kazakhstan in New York, who requested contact information for those involved in Kryazhova’s stay in the U.S.

The Maroses assured Kubashev they are happy to assist.

“Taissiya worked all her life to earn the right to the FLEX scholarship, and I am appalled that we were not able to truly welcome her to America with open arms.”

kheerbrandt@gazette.net

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Pacific Intercultural’s downfall

2010 Apr 16: James sentenced for molestation

Florida Department of Law Enforcement – Sexual Offender / Predator Flyer
Picture of an Offender or Predator

Shernon James
Date Of Photo: 06/03/2014

Click Here to Track this Offender
Designation: Sexual Offender
Name: Shernon James
Status: Supervised – FL Dept of Corrections
Department of Corrections #: X70993
Search the Dept of Corrections Website
Date of Birth: 06/03/1982
Race : Black
Sex: Male
Hair: Black
Eyes: Brown
Height: 5’10”
Weight: 175 lbs
James is registered as a Sexual Offender.
Positive identification cannot be established unless a fingerprint comparison is made.
Aliases
JAMES SHERNON, SHERNAN JAMES
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Address Information
Address Address Source Information Map Link
323 Ferrara Ct
POINCIANA
Kissimmee, FL 34758-4327
Osceola COUNTY
Source: Dept. of Corrections
Received: 01/09/2015
Type of Address: Permanent
Show Map
Crime Information – Qualifying Offenses
Adjudication Date Crime Description Court Case Number Jurisdiction & State Adjudication
04/16/2010 Lewd or lascivious molestation victim 12-15 years old offender 18 or older; F.S. 800.04(5)(c)(2) 0903242 OSCEOLA, FL Guilty/convict
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Gender:Unknown  Minor:Yes

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————————————————————

Shernon N James

2012 Dec 6: AP: PIE lost its government designation

Yahoo | November 30, 2012 | By Holbrock Mohr | Associated Press

JACKSON – (AP) An organization has lost its government designation to bring foreign exchange students to the United States after facing allegations of mismanagement and lax oversight that included students being placed in homes where they were sexually abused.

State Department spokeswoman Susan Pittman told The Associated Press that Pacific Intercultural Exchange, or PIE, was removed from the department’s list of official sponsors.

State Department officials haven’t said exactly what problems led to PIE’s removal, but documents and emails obtained by AP in July showed allegations of serious problems, including sexual abuse by host fathers. The documents also showed that the State Department had concerns about PIE’s operations for years.

The San Diego-based company was part of a network of organizations that brings close to 30,000 high school students to the U.S. annually.

PIE and other sponsors charge the students’ families thousands of dollars to arrange for them to live in American households and go to high school. The U.S. government also gives grants to students from some countries.

PIE was suspended from the program in July. The company challenged the suspension, but it was upheld during an administrative appeals process. The suspension affected more than 455 students from 18 countries for this school year.

The State Department also decided at that time to deny PIE’s sponsor re-designation, which comes up for renewal every two years.

The company faced a deadline earlier this month to appeal the decision, but decided not to challenge it, meaning the company was removed from the sponsor list, Pittman said.

“The department has had long-standing concerns that PIE operated its exchange program in a manner that put at risk the health, safety and welfare of student participants,” Pittman said. “The department remains vigilant in its oversight of exchange visitor program sponsors to ensure that the participants’ experiences are safe and rewarding.”

Two of the most serious cases of problems involved host fathers convicted of sexually abusing exchange students, including one in which PIE was accused of failing to do an adequate background check.

Craig Steven Ley

In one of the sexual abuse cases, PIE host father Craig Steven Ley of Beaverton, Oregon, pleaded guilty in 2010 to sexually abusing a German boy. PIE didn’t do an adequate background check which would have disclosed Ley had a felony record for using another exchange student in a bogus insurance claim, according to a lawsuit filed on behalf of the student.

PIE President John Doty testified in September as part of the lawsuit that his company had known since 2006 that Ley was a convicted felon, though he denied personal knowledge of Ley’s criminal record and said his company didn’t know the prior crime involved an exchange student.

The company also tried to falsify records in 2010 to conceal the fact that it brought a 17-year-old girl from Kazakhstan to Maryland without having her registered for school, according to documents reviewed by AP. The students are supposed to be registered for school before coming to the U.S. The girl ended up going home disappointed and distraught.

Officials in Louisiana were so alarmed by the living conditions of PIE students that in 2010 the Vermillion Parish School Board banned the company from placing students in the district.

Doty, the PIE president, told his staff in a 2006 email that the company narrowly dodged sanctions for canceling “a number” of students who signed up to participate in 2005. The email also said Doty went to Washington D.C., in 2006 to meet with State Department officials because he was again faced with canceling participants, this time 113 Korean students.

PIE’s website says it has brought more than 25,000 students to the U.S. since the 1970s.

The company generated nearly $3.5 million from October 2009 to September 2010, according to a 2011 IRS filing required of nonprofit organizations. About $1.26 million was from government contributions or grants, but the majority of the company’s money, about $2.26 million, came from its foreign program fees, according to the document. The company’s website says it has facilitated exchanges for more than 25,000 high school students since the 1970s.


Craig Steven Ley

Shernon N James

2004 May 22: Sex Abuse Lawsuit against Former St. Ann’s Priest Settled

2006 Feb 24: U.S. Increases Protection for Foreign Teens

2006 Sep 05: Exchange Students from Middle East Arrive in America Without Homes, an alert for student community

2008 May 07: Agencies seek to silence child protection group (article about this case)

2010: Student Exchange Programs an Unregulated Industry

2010 Apr 08: Vermilion Parish School Board “Approved terminating the Board’s relationship with Pacific Intercultural Exchange for the placement of foreign exchange students at parish high schools.”

2010 Apr 16: Shernon N James deemed predator

2010 Jul 04: Schools have problems with foreign  exchange student companies

2010 Sep 09: Foreign exchange student goes home to Kazakhstan (PIE)

2011 Jan 05: Beaverton man will serve 5 years in prison for sex abuse of high school exchange student

2011 Dec 06: Homestay Services International, Pacific Intercultural Exchange Under Fire

2012 Jul 20: Pacific Intercultural Exchange, Sponsor Company For High School Exchange Students, Suspended By State Department

2012 Jul 30: Utvekslingsåret ble et mareritt (“Live kontaktet utvekslingsorganisasjonen Pacific Intercultural Exchange (PIE). Der fikk hun beskjed om at hun måtte sette seg ned med familien og ordne opp selv.”)

2012 Aug 02: US student exchange group hits a hurdle (“The San Diego-based Pacific Intercultural Exchange (PIE) has been suspended from the US visa program used by students on exchange trips over undisclosed rule violations.”)

2012 Sep 26: Pacific Intercultural Exchange president tells jurors he didn’t admit to feds he knew of felony in Beaverton case

2012 Sept 28: Multnomah County jury learns Pacific Intercultural Exchange host father possessed adult gay porn

2012 Oct 03: Exchange student’s lawsuit against Beaverton host father, Pacific Intercultural Exchange ends in settlement

2012 Nov 30: Non-Redesignation of Secondary School Student Exchange Sponsor  (“The Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) has removed Pacific Intercultural Exchange (PIE) of San Diego from its list of designated Secondary School Student Exchange Visitor Program (EVP) sponsors, effective November 28, 2012.”)

2012 Dec 06: AP: Exchange student sponsor out over abuse claims

2006-2013: Closed Sanction cases – 2013

2011 Jan 05: Ley sentenced for sex abuse of high school exchange student

Oregon Live | By Emily E. Smith | esmith@oregonian.com
updated January 05, 2011 at 9:50 PM

A Beaverton man who sexually abused the high school exchange student he hosted last school yearwas sentenced Wednesday to five years in prison.Craig Steven Ley, 51, facing five counts of first-degree and five counts of second-degree sex abuse, took a plea deal last month and pleaded guilty to four counts of second-degree sex abuse.Washington County Judge Eric Butterfield sentenced Ley Wednesday afternoon, granting the sentence Ley and prosecutors agreed to in the deal.

The victim, a 16-year-old European boy, was living with Ley and attending a Beaverton school as a foreign exchange student when the abuse occurred.

In June 2010, the boy reported months of abuse that began early in his stay with Ley.

Deputy District Attorney Paul Maloney said Ley, an active member of the Beaverton lacrosse community, had hosted exchange students previously, but officials found no evidence of prior abuse.

Maloney described in court Wednesday how the relationship between Ley and his victim quickly escalated to the two sleeping in Ley’s bed every night and having daily sexual contact.

A visitor in a foreign country, the boy “was completely and utterly reliant on the defendant,” Maloney said.

“When he would talk to his parents over Skype,” Maloney said, “the defendant would always be lurking about; he would pop in and out sporadically throughout the phone calls.”

His parents never knew that their son’s host father lived alone, had filed bankruptcy and had a 2004 federal felony mail fraud conviction.

The teen didn’t see his family in person until his aunt came from Germany to visit him at Ley’s home in June 2010, shortly before his high school graduation, Maloney said.

He then admitted to his aunt that he slept in Ley’s bed, and his aunt recognized, “this was not the American dream,” Maloney said.

His aunt took him to CARES Northwest, a program that assesses and treats child abuse, and a criminal investigation began.

Ley pulled off the inappropriate relationship by taking advantage of the victim’s vulnerability, Maloney said, and playing off the behavior as fun and normal.

Defense attorney Devon Fooks said Ley’s actions were less sinister than Maloney described.

Fooks said his client didn’t groom or prey upon the student but leaned on him for emotional support during a troubling year. Ley developed a friendship with the boy that “went too far,” Fooks said.

The abuse didn’t occur daily or “with great frequency,” Fooks added, and sometimes the victim initiated the acts.

While those facts don’t relieve Ley of any responsibility, Fooks said, the abuse was “situational more than predatory.”

Ley addressed the court, offering an apology to his victim and family, and explaining that he genuinely cared for the victim and the previous 18 exchange students he had hosted.

“To hurt anybody who I cared for … in my home – that hurts and tears my heart apart,” he said.

For years Ley and his ex-wife alternated hosting boys and girls each year, he said, and he treated them as he would his own children.

In the 2009-10 school year, Ley said, “I had a difficult time stepping up and being an adult that year.”

Butterfield ordered Ley to register as a sex offender when he is released from prison.

Emily E. Smith


2004 May 17: USA v. Ley Oregon District Court, Case No. 3:03-cr-00576-KI

2008 Jul 18: Programmes Internationaux D’Echanges v. Grijalva: Conspiracy; Defamation; Tortious Interference

2010 Jun 15: Beaverton lacrosse coach arrested on multiple sex abuse counts

2010 Dec 21: Exchange student’s Beaverton host father pleads guilty to sex abuse

2010 Jun 15: Ley arrested on multiple sex abuse counts

Wendy Owen | wowen@oregonian.com By Wendy Owen | wowen@oregonian.com
on June 15, 2010 at 2:30 AM, updated June 15, 2010 at 4:22 PM

Craig Ley, 50, a board member of Beaverton High School Lacrosse Club and a lacrosse coach for Beaverton Youth Lacrosse, was arrested Monday on 10 counts of sexual abuse, involving a teenage exchange student.

ley.jpgCraig Ley

The 16-year-old boy was living with Ley, said Sgt. VanceStimler, a Washington County Sheriff’s Officespokesman.The abuse occurred off and on from October until June of this year, and was discovered after relatives of the victim visited the Ley household, according to the sheriff’s office. This is not the first exchange student Ley has hosted.

“We are concerned there may be other victims,” Stimler said.

The exchange student was not a member of Ley’s lacrosse team.  Beaverton High School Lacrosse is a club sport run by parents and is not a program of the Beaverton School District.

The victim attended school in Beaverton, which relies on the exchange student agencies to ensure the safe placement of the foreign students, said Maureen Wheeler, Beaverton School District spokeswoman.

District policy requires the exchange program be approved and in good standing, have a local representative who can meet with school personnel and has demonstrated successful placement of students in the past,  among other requirements.

According to court records, Ley does not have any criminal convictions in Oregon.

The sheriffs office is asking anyone who has specific information that Ley had illegal contact with other minors to call the Washington County Sheriff’s Office at (503) 846-2700.
Wendy Owen

Oregonian reporter Colleen Stewart contributed to this story.

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2004 May 17: USA v. Ley Oregon District Court, Case No. 3:03-cr-00576-KI

2008 Jul 18: Programmes Internationaux D’Echanges v. Grijalva: Conspiracy; Defamation; Tortious Interference

2006 Sep 05: Exchange Students from Middle East Arrive in America Without Homes, an alert for student community

Tuesday, September, 05 2006 – 10:57

OCEANSIDE(USA): Danielle Grijalva, Director Committee for Safety of Foreign Exchange Students, Oceanside, California has issued an alert for students coming to USA from various countries.

“Twenty-five teenagers from Lebanon, Ganza, Ukraine, Jordan, Algeria, Yemen, Kuwait, Muldova and Ukraine are without homes.

The students are here through the YES/FLEX program, wherein the student exchange agency Pacific Intercultural Exchange (PIE) was awarded millions of tax payer grants to invite these teenagers to the United States.  PIE failed to secure host families and schools and have left these children stranded and confused. ……..